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  Retirement Planning > Individual Investors > Roth IRAsWhat is the deadline for contributing to an IRA? What is the deadline for contributing to an IRA for 2018? How much can I contribute to my IRA for 2018 or 2019? What are the IRA contribution limits for 2018 and 2019?

 

What is a Roth IRA?


Traditional IRAs

Roth IRAs

Rollover IRAs IRA FAQs

Funding Reference

 

Roth Contribution Limits 2017

 

Roth Contribution Limits 2018

Open a Roth IRA Account

 

Get Important Information Regarding your IRA Brokerage Account


 

What is a Roth IRA? How can a Roth IRA help me save for retirement? How can I get Tax FREE capital gains?

Your Place Trade Roth IRA helps keep your retirement plan on track and allows you to get tax free income during retirement! Trade stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, unsettled funds & more!

Learn the facts, benefits and drawbacks of investing in a Roth IRA. This page offers educational information that you may use in addition to consulting with your tax advisor to see if a Roth IRA may be right for you. 

 

Quick Facts about Roth IRAs:

 

 

A Roth IRA is an IRA that is actually subject to many of the same rules that apply to a Traditional IRA however there are a few major exceptions that make the Roth IRA particularly attractive for individuals who do not need a tax deduction at the present time and have five or more years before they need to take withdrawals.

The major difference between a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA include the following exceptions:

  • You cannot deduct contributions to a Roth IRA.
  • If you satisfy the requirements, qualified distributions are tax-free.
  • You can make contributions to your Roth IRA after you reach age 70 ½.
  • You can leave amounts in your Roth IRA as long as you live.
  • The account or annuity must be designated as a Roth IRA when it is set up.
  • Roth IRA contribution limits are identical to those for the traditional IRA. However, unlike traditions IRAs, the ability of a participant to contribute to a Roth IRA may be limited by his or her adjusted gross income.

Find out how much you may be eligible to contribute to your Roth IRA for 2014 & 2015 by viewing the chart below.

  

 
 

 

         
 

3 Quick Steps to Opening Your Roth IRA

 

 How to Fund your Roth IRA Account*

 
 

1. Open an Account Online

2. Fund Your Account 

3. Start Investing (or call an Experienced Advisor)

 

1. Make a contribution

2. Transfer or Rollover an account

3. Traditional IRA to Roth IRA Conversion

 
 

 

 

 

 

  *You can even do this within the application via the "Funding" section!

Follow the links above to get more information on Roth IRAs and other retirement accounts available at Place Trade as well as information on rollovers and guidance that is specific to your IRA account. Please call us at 800-50-PLACE or 91719-7200 for help opening your Roth (or Traditional) IRA today! 

Prior year contributions must be very clearly marked and you should allow several (5-10) days for processing. If you are getting down to the wire you may want to literally wire funds in so that you do not miss the April 15th IRS deadline. Call us for more information or for assistance.

 

 

 

Top Roth IRA

Jump to a section by clicking one of the links below: 

Traditional IRA Basics

Get more info at IRS.gov

Why participate in a Roth IRA?

How to get tax free capital gains

Roth IRA Contribution Limits

Roth IRA Deductibility Limits

Roth IRA Non-Deductible Contributions

Important Things to Remember about Roth IRAs

Roth Rollover and Conversion Contributions

Roth-to-Roth IRA Rollovers

Conversion from a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA

Check out the Retirement Plan Rollover Chart

Re-characterization of a Roth IRA back to a Traditional IRA

Qualified Roth IRA Distributions

Non-qualified Roth IRA Distributions

Withholding

Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) at Age 70 1/2

IRS Reporting Requirements for Roth IRAs

IRA Non-Deductible Contributions

Important Things to Remember about Contribution Limits

Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) at Age 70 1/2

IRS Reporting Requirements for Roth IRAs

 

  

Why participate in a Roth IRA?

  • Earnings accumulated tax-free
  • Qualified distributions are tax and penalty free
  • Contributions can always be recovered tax and penalty free
  • If you satisfy the requirements, qualified distributions are tax-free
  • You can make contributions to your Roth IRA after you reach age 70 ½
  • You can leave amounts in your Roth IRA as long as you live

Note: Due to changing laws, it is always best to review your individual circumstances with a qualified Tax Advisor. Place Trade Financial does not offer tax advice.


Top Roth IRA

How to get FREE Capital Gains: Invest in a Roth IRA!

 

How can I get Tax FREE Capital Gains on my investments? 

  • Simply invest your money in your own Roth IRA and pay no taxes on your gains! Yes, this is true. Earnings on your investments (a.k.a. profits/gains on your trades) accumulate tax-free in your Roth IRA. 
   

Note: Due to changing laws, it is always best to review your individual circumstances with a qualified Tax Advisor. Place Trade Financial does not offer tax advice.


Top Roth IRA

Traditional IRA & Roth IRA Contribution Limits 

What are the Roth IRA contribution limits this year? How much can I contribute to IRA 2018? 

IRA Contribution Limits ~ 2016, 2017 & 2018

You may make an eligible contribution for your 2018 Traditional or Roth IRA at any time prior to the 2018 IRS tax filing deadline which is Monday, April 15, 2019. (Your account must be funded or have proof of postmark by this date! For brokerage accounts - please check to see our clearing firm's required cutoff date for eligible contributions.) 

The same general contribution limit applies to both Roth and traditional IRAs. However, your Roth IRA contribution might be limited based on your filing status and income.


Please Note: For 2016, 2017 and 2018, your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs (combined for the given tax year) cannot be more than:
         

 

Under Age 50  

 

Total

Under Age 50  

 

Over Age 50

Additional 

 Total

Over Age 50

2016* **

$5,500

Catch-up Contribution

$1,000

$6,500

2017* **

$5,500

Catch-up Contribution

$1,000

$6,500

2018* ** $5,500 Catch-up Contribution $1,000 $6,500

 Source: irs.gov

"Total" means your total contributions to all of your Traditional and Roth IRAs combined for the given tax year. You cannot exceed the total amount/contribution limit regardless of how many IRAs that you have or the type/types of IRA(s) that you may have.

*Or your taxable compensation for the year.

** Effective for the tax year 2002 and beyond, for participants who are eligible to make an IRA contribution and have attained the age of 50 before the end of the taxable year, the participant can make a "catch-up" contribution in addition to the normal contribution amount as shown in the table above. The catch-up contribution was $500 from 2002-2005. For the year 2006 and beyond, the catch-up contribution limit will be $1000. The maximum contribution cannot exceed 100% of actual compensation. Learn more about COLA Increases for Dollar Limitations on Benefits and Contributions from the IRS.

 

Please note that the IRA contribution limit does not apply to:

Deductibility limits can be confusing and tax laws are frequently changing. It is always best to review your specific situation and/or circumstances with a qualified tax advisor.

 

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited


 

 Top Roth IRA

 


Open an IRA online or call us at 1-800-50-PLACE or 1-919-719-7200 to speak with an experienced retirement specialist to help you rollover your old retirement account or help you start planning for retirement today!  

 


 
 

Back to the top: Roth IRAs

 

Important things to Remember about your Roth IRA

  • Who can contribute? Any individual with income, subject to income limitations.

  • Contributions are aggregated with Traditional IRA Contributions. The contributions to a Roth IRA are aggregated with contributions to a traditional IRA for the purpose of the annual maximum contribution limit. Essentially, an individual may contribute to both a traditional and a Roth IRA for a given year, however the total amount of contributions to both accounts may not exceed $5,000 for the 2012 tax year or $5,500 for the 2013 tax year. (Note: $6,500 for individuals over age 50).

 

  • Deductibility of Roth IRA Contributions: Contributions to a Roth IRA are not deductible. All contributions to a Roth IRA can be recovered tax and penalty free.

  • Contributions are permitted after age 70 ½.

  • Distributions from a Roth IRA are tax and penalty free after the five year holding period has passed and the participant has either reached age 59 ½, has died or has used the distribution for a qualified first time home purchase (limit to $10,000 over a lifetime). Other exceptions may also apply. Visit www.irs.gov for more details.

  • Earnings on contributions will be subject to a 10% penalty by the IRS if withdrawn prior to mandatory five-year holding period and prior to age 59 ½.

  • Contributions may be made (and account may be established) no later than the due date for filing income tax returns for the year for which the contribution is being made, not including extension, generally April 15th. In other words, contributions for a prior year can be made up to April 15th of the current year unless the IRS grants an extension.

 

 Top Roth IRA

Roth Rollover and Conversion Contributions

 

Qualified rollover contributions to a Roth IRA include Roth-to-Roth IRA rollovers and conversion of traditional IRA assets to a Roth IRA. Rollovers from an employer-qualified plan to a Roth IRA are not permitted.

 

Roth-to-Roth IRA Rollovers

Rollovers of assets from one Roth IRA to another Roth IRA follow the rules for traditional IRA rollovers. For assets to be eligible for rollover they must have come from an account that has had no rollover contributions or distributions within the prior 12 months. Roth-to-Roth rollovers are reported to the IRS.

 

 

Conversion from a Traditional IRA to Roth IRA

Any conversion of assets from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA after 1998 fully includes in the gross income of the IRA participant in the year in which the distribution from the IRA is made. The rules for recovery of nondeductible contributions from the traditional IRA will apply. The 10% additional tax that applies to premature distributions will not apply to distributions that are converted to a Roth IRA.

Please note that as of 2010, there are no income limits on IRA to Roth IRA conversions.

A Traditional IRA participant is prohibited from converting a required minimum distribution into a Roth IRA.

Distribution of assets from the traditional IRA will be reported on IRS Form 1099 R, and the conversion contribution to the Roth IRA will be reported on IRS Form 5498.

 

 Roth IRA Facts

Re-characterization of a Roth IRA back to a Traditional IRA

A participant may re-characterize Roth IRA contributions in one of three ways:

  • By transferring a regular contribution made to a Roth IRA plus earnings to a traditional IRA. This may occur when a participant learns that she is ineligible to make a Roth IRA.

  • By transferring a regular contribution made to a traditional IRA plus earnings to a Roth IRA. This may occur when a participant learns that he will be ineligible to take a deduction for his traditional IRA contribution.

  • By reversing a contribution plus earnings made from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. This may occur when the IRA participant's adjusted gross income is too high to allow the Roth conversions.

Regardless of the type of re-characterization, both the distribution and the contribution are reported to the IRS.

 

 Top Roth IRA Facts

Qualified Roth IRA Distributions (Withdrawals)

 

Qualified Distributions from a Roth IRA may be recovered tax and penalty free if the distributions satisfy two conditions:

1.  The distribution is made from the Roth IRA after a period of five years has elapsed since the first day of the year in which the first contribution was made to the Roth IRA, and;

2.  One of the following conditions is satisfied:

 i.  The participant had attained the age of 59½

ii.  The distribution is made to the participant's beneficiary after the participant's death

iii.  The participant is disabled

iv.  The distribution is used for qualified first time home purchase expenses

v.  The distribution is used for qualified education, medical or unemployment expenses. Visit http://www.irs.gov for more details.

If the Roth IRA distribution meets both of the conditions above, the distribution is not included in the gross income of the individual.

 Top Roth IRA Facts

Non-qualified Roth IRA Distributions (Withdrawals)

 

A distribution from a Roth IRA that does not meet the requirements of a qualified distribution, and is neither rolled over to another Roth IRA nor re-characterized to a traditional IRA, is considered a non-qualified distribution.

  • A non-qualified distribution is taxable only when all of the aggregate contributions in the Roth IRA have been distributed. In other words, only the earnings in a Roth IRA are taxable when a distribution is non-qualified.

  • The IRS has implemented ordering rules that define the order in which distributions are made from a Roth IRA. Distributions are made first from regular Roth IRA contributions, next from conversion contributions, and finally from earnings.

  • The taxable portion of the non-qualified distribution may be subject to the 10% additional tax on premature distributions if it does not qualify for any of the exceptions to the premature distribution penalty.

  • The amount of a non-qualified distribution that comes from conversion contributions may be subject to an additional 10% penalty, if the distribution is made before 5 years have elapsed, since the first day of the year in which the conversion was made.

 

 

Withholding

 
Top Roth IRA Facts

Distributions from a Roth IRA are subject to federal income tax withholding at the rate of 10% unless the participant elects to waive withholding.

 

Required Distributions at Age 70 ½

Roth IRA accounts are not subject to the required minimum distribution regulations.

IRS Reporting Requirements for Roth IRAs

Tax reporting requirements for a Roth IRA are identical to those for a Traditional IRA.

Distributions are reported to the IRS on Form 1099 R.

Learn about how tax reporting for your account by visit: Tax Information and Reporting

For more information please visit www.irs.gov

Deductible limits can be confusing and tax laws are frequently changing. It is always best to review your specific situation and/or circumstances with a qualified tax adviser.

Back to the top: Roth IRAs

Roth IRA Non-Deductible Contributions

You cannot make non-deductible contributions to your Roth IRA.


Top Roth IRA Facts

Important Things to Remember:

Contribution Limits: There is no minimum contribution limit per the IRS. However, most brokerage firms, mutual fund and investment management companies do require account minimums so please be sure to inquire prior to investing.

Talk with an IRA Rollover Specialist Today Call 1-800-50-PLACE

 

 

Check out the Retirement Plan Rollover Chart

Follow the link above to review all of the various types of retirement plans to see where (what other types of retirement plans) your existing plan may be rolled into according to IRS guidelines.  

Back to the top: Roth IRAs

 

Details about Roth IRAs are contained in Publication 590-A, Contributions to Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) and Publication 590-B, Distributions from Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) and include:

  • Setting up your Roth IRA (per IRS info - Not Place Trade specific info);
  • Contributions to your Roth IRA; and
  • Distributions from your Roth IRA.
  • Differences Between Roth IRAs and Designated Roth Accounts
  • Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)


Call us today at 1-800-50-PLACE (1-800-507-5223, 919-719-7200) to get started!
 


(Please be sure to check with your tax and/or legal advisor prior to making any contributions, withdrawals or other changes to your retirement account. Place Trade Financial, Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Information provided by Place Trade is for educational purposes and should not be considered as tax or legal advice under any circumstances.)    

     
 
     
 

 Retirement Planning 

 
 

Traditional IRA

 Roth IRA 

 
 

SEP IRA

SIMPLE IRA

 
 

 401(k) Rollover 

Rollover IRA

 
 

 Switching Jobs? Know your Options 

Leaving your old 401(k) behind

 
 

Cashing Out of your 401(k)

 From Ramen to Retirement

 
 

Qualified Plans

Get Advice or Trade Online

 
 

Can I Trade Options in my IRA?

 Can I Trade on Margin in my IRA?

 
 

FAQs: IRA Account Configuration

Easily Open an IRA online now!

 
     
 
     

IRS Circular 230 Notice: These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor.

 


 Learn about IRAs, Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, Minimize taxes with qualified contributions to your retirement account.  Make "Catch-up contributions" if you are over 50.  Learn about income limits/deduction limits for Single, Head of household, Qualified widow or widower, married filing jointly, married filing separately, spouse not covered by plan at work, spouse, no plan at work, plan at work, lived with spouse, agi, adjusted gross income, ira deduction, full deduction, partial deductions and so much more!
Top Roth IRA Facts

 

Call us today at 1-800-50-PLACE (1-800-507-5223, 919-719-7200) for more information! 

 

 

Retirement Planning > Individual Investors > RothIRAsWhat is the deadline for contributing to an IRA? What is the deadline for contributing to an IRA for 2018? How much can I contribute to my IRA for 2018 or 2019? What are the IRA contribution limits for 2018 and 2019?

 

Roth IRA Contribution and Deduction Limits ~ 2018


Traditional IRAs

Roth IRAs

Rollover IRAs IRA FAQs

Funding Reference


How much can I contribute to a Roth IRA (if I am eligible to make a contribution)?


Quick Links:

Am I eligible to make a tax-deductible IRA contribution? Is my Roth contribution tax-deductible? 

What are the Roth IRA contribution limits for 2018? Traditional & Roth IRA Contribution Limits ~ 2016, 2017 & 2018

What is the deadline for contributing to an IRA? 

 


 

Roth IRA Limits 2017     Traditional IRA Contribution Limits 2018

What is the deadline for contributing to an IRA? What is the deadline for contributing to an IRA for 2018? 

2018 Traditional or Roth IRA Deadline:

You may make a contribution for your 2018 Traditional or Roth IRA at any time prior to the 2018 IRS tax filing deadline which is on Monday, April 15, 2019.*

Why do we have extra time to file our taxes this year? (Click)

 

 
Roth IRA Contribution Limits
 
Learn about Roth IRAs

Get Important Information Regarding your IRA Brokerage Account

 

Why Should You Open an IRA? Why Should I Open an IRA?

Are you eligible to make a Roth IRA contribution?

First, Let's double check to see which type of retirement account you want to contribute to today. If you are looking for a tax break and wish to make a tax-deductible contribution today, then you should consider a Traditional IRA instead of a Roth IRA. If you want to make an after-tax contribution to your retirement plan today, then you should continue on this page and check out our Roth IRA page for more information as well. 

 

 
Is my Roth contribution tax-deductible?

 

No, Roth IRA contributions are not tax-deductible. If you would prefer to enjoy the tax benefits when you take the money out then you should continue reading below. Otherwise >>>

 

 
I want to make a tax-deductible contribution to my retirement plan!

 

Since Roth IRA contributions are not deductible, you may wish to consider contributing to a Traditional IRA instead.

 

 

 

Whether or not you are eligible to make a (non-deductible) Roth IRA contribution this year depends on several factors. To help you get started, we have listed a few of the important questions that you should ask yourself (and review with your tax and/or legal advisor) to find out if you may be eligible to make a contribution to your Roth IRA this year:

 

 

Can I contribute to a Roth IRA? 

 

Will your 2018 contribution to a Roth IRA be affected by the amount of your modified AGI (how much you earn for tax purposes)?

 

How to figure the amount of your reduced Roth IRA contribution 

 

Can I contribute to a Roth IRA if I participate in a retirement plan at work?

 

Can I contribute to both a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA in the same year?

 

How much can I contribute to a Roth IRA (if I am eligible)? 

 

Can I make a contribution to an IRA after age 70½? 

 

 

 

Find out if you can make an after-tax (non-deductible) contribution to your Roth IRA based on your personal situation. Will the effect of modified AGI impact your ability to make a contribution to your Roth IRA? Be sure to review your personal situation with your tax advisor prior to making any tax-related decisions or investments.

      

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and InheritedIs my IRA contribution deductible? Can I deduct my ira contribution? Is my Roth IRA Contribution deductible? Can I deduct the money that I put in m my Roth IRA?  


Can you contribute to an IRA if you have a retirement plan at work?

How much can I contribute to IRA 2018?

Can I contribute to a Roth IRA if I participate in a retirement plan at work?
 

You can contribute to a Traditional or Roth IRA whether or not you (or your spouse) participate in another retirement plan through your employer or business. However, it is important to note that:

  • Traditional IRAs: You may not be able to deduct all of your traditional IRA contributions if you or your spouse participate in another retirement plan at work. View Deductibility Limits for 2017 and for 2018 Traditional IRAs.
  • Roth IRAs: You may not be able to make a Roth IRA contribution or your contribution may be limited if you make too much money. Please review the chart below to see if you are eligible to make a Roth IRA contribution. Please remember that Roth IRA contributions are NOT tax-deductible.

 


 

 

Can I contribute to both a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA in the same year?

 

Yes, if eligible, you can contribute to both a Traditional and Roth IRAin the same tax year. However, it is important to note that your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs (combined for the given tax year) cannot be more than you are eligible for under the given year's IRA Contribution Limits. You cannot double down and put the maximum in each.

Think of it like this: if you are under 50* and you are fully eligible to make the maximum contribution for the year ($5,500 in 2017 & 2018), You can put a total of the maximum away ($5,500 in 2017 and another $5,500 in 2018) in either a Roth, a Traditional IRA or in any combination of the two as long as you do not exceed the annual contribution limit.

 

   

 

For example,

You could split it 50/50 and put $2,750 in each or you could put $500 in your Roth IRA and $5,000 in your Traditional IRA.

You can split it up anyway that you would like - just keep in mind that it may not make sense to have an IRA with a super low balance in it because you may not be able to do much with it (as far as diversifying goes) and you may incur account fees (at most firms) that could eat into your long term-saving goals. 

 

   

 

The amount that you put in the Traditional IRA will be tax-deductible now and the amount that you put in the Roth will receive tax benefits when you take the money out (unless there are changes to the tax laws or you take an unqualified distribution - which, of course, we do not recommend).  

*If you are 50 or better, you get to add even more money thanks to your Catch-up contributions!

 


IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited

 

Can I contribute to a Roth IRA?  

Although Roth IRA CONTRIBUTIONS ARE NOT TAX-DEDUCTIBLE, you must be eligible to make a contribution. Use the table below to see if you may be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA. (This table shows whether your contribution to a Roth IRA is affected by the amount of your modified AGI as computed for Roth IRA purpose. Source: irs.gov) Please be sure to consult with your tax and/or legal advisor prior to making IRA contributions.

 

Will your 2018 contribution to a Roth IRA be affected by the amount of your modified AGI?

 

If your filing status is:

And your modified AGI is:

Then you can contribute:

married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)

< $189,000

up to the limit

> $189,000 but < $199,000

a reduced amount

> $199,000

zero

married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year

< $10,000

a reduced amount

> $10,000

zero

single, head of household, or married filing separately and you did not live with your spouse at any time during the year

< $120,000

up to the limit

> $120,000 but < $135,000

a reduced amount

> $135,000

zero

 

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited


 

How to figure the amount of your reduced Roth IRA contribution:

According to the IRS:

 

Amount of your reduced Roth IRA contribution 

If the amount you can contribute must be reduced, figure your reduced contribution limit as follows.

  1. Start with your modified AGI.
  2. Subtract from the amount in (1):
    1. $189,000 if filing a joint return or qualifying widow(er),
    2. $-0- if married filing a separate return, and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year, or
    3. $120,000 for all other individuals.
  3. Divide the result in (2) by $15,000 ($10,000 if filing a joint return, qualifying widow(er), or married filing a separate return and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year).
  4. Multiply the maximum contribution limit (before reduction by this adjustment and before reduction for any contributions to traditional IRAs) by the result in (3).
  5. Subtract the result in (4) from the maximum contribution limit before this reduction. The result is your reduced contribution limit.

 

Please see Publication 590-A, Contributions to Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), for more details including a worksheet to figure your reduced contribution and be sure to speak with your tax and/or legal advisor prior to making any tax-related decisions. Please review Publication 590-A (2018 when available), for specific issues related to Contributions to Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) for use in preparing 2018 Returns. The current link shown is for 2016 which is currently posted on irs.com as of January 2018.


 

2018 Traditional IRA Contribution and Deduction Limits - Effect of Modified AGI on IRA Contributions

 

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited


 

Learn about Rollover IRAs an how easy it is to Transfer your IRA account (from another firm) to an existing account Place Trade®

 

 

What are the Roth IRA contribution limits for 2018? How much can I contribute to IRA 2018? 

IRA Contribution Limits ~ 2016, 2017 & 2018

You may make an eligible contribution for your 2018 Traditional or Roth IRA at any time prior to the 2018 IRS tax filing deadline which is Monday, April 15, 2019. (Your account must be funded or have proof of postmark by this date! For brokerage accounts - please check to see our clearing firm's required cutoff date for eligible contributions.) 

 

The same general contribution limit applies to both Roth and traditional IRAs. However, your Roth IRA contribution might be limited based on your filing status and income.


Please Note: For 2016, 2017 and 2018, your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs (combined for the given tax year) cannot be more than:
         

 

Under Age 50  

 

Total

Under Age 50  

 

Over Age 50

Additional 

 Total

Over Age 50

2016* **

$5,500

Catch-up Contribution

$1,000

$6,500

2017* **

$5,500

Catch-up Contribution

$1,000

$6,500

2018* ** $5,500 Catch-up Contribution $1,000 $6,500

 Source: irs.gov

"Total" means your total contributions to all of your Traditional and Roth IRAs combined for the given tax year. You cannot exceed the total amount/contribution limit regardless of how many IRAs that you have or the type/types of IRA(s) that you may have.

*Or your taxable compensation for the year.

** Effective for the tax year 2002 and beyond, for participants who are eligible to make an IRA contribution and have attained the age of 50 before the end of the taxable year, the participant can make a "catch-up" contribution in addition to the normal contribution amount as shown in the table above. The catch-up contribution was $500 from 2002-2005. For the year 2006 and beyond, the catch-up contribution limit will be $1000. The maximum contribution cannot exceed 100% of actual compensation. Learn more about COLA Increases for Dollar Limitations on Benefits and Contributions from the IRS.

 

Please note that the IRA contribution limit does not apply to:

Deductibility limits can be confusing and tax laws are frequently changing. It is always best to review your specific situation and/or circumstances with a qualified tax advisor.

 

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited


 

Can I make a contribution to an IRA after age 70½?

 

 

 

 
Traditional IRA
 
Roth IRA
 
  NO   YES  
 

 

 

Contributions to IRAs after age 70½

 

Can I make a contribution to my Traditional IRA after age 70½?
No, you cannot make regular contributions to a Traditional IRA in the year you reach 70½ and older.

 

Can I make a contribution to my Roth IRA after age 70½?
Yes, you can still contribute to a Roth IRA and make rollover contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA regardless of your age.

 


 

 

 

 

Open an IRA online or call us at 1-800-50-PLACE or 1-919-719-7200 to speak with an experienced retirement specialist to help you rollover your old retirement account or help you start planning for retirement today!  

 

IRAs - Traditional, Roth, SEP, Rollovers and Inherited

 

 

Call us today at 1-800-50-PLACE (1-800-507-5223, 919-719-7200) for more information! 

 

 


 
   

 

  

 Get More Info About Retirement Planning with these Related Links:

 

 

 

Retirement Planning

Traditional IRA

Roth IRA

SEP IRA

SIMPLE IRA

Qualified Plans

Rollover IRAs

401(k) Rollover

Leaving your old 401(k) behind

Cashing Out of your 401(k)

Switching Jobs? Know your Options

From Ramen to Retirement

Get Advice or Trade Online

Can I Trade Options or on Margin in my IRA? Yes

 

 

Should you have further questions, please contact our Client Service Center at 919-719-7200. Additionally, you may contact us via live chat or secure message (by logging in to Account Managementfor assistance.

 

________________________________________________________________________

Important Notes: IRA contribution deadline 2018

  • *MA residents may make prior year 2018 IRA contributions thru Tuesday, April 16, 2019.
  • Please be sure to check with your tax and/or legal advisor prior to making any contributions, withdrawals or other changes to your retirement account. Place Trade Financial, Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Information provided by Place Trade is for educational purposes and should not be considered as tax or legal advice under any circumstances.
  • Please view IRS Publication 590: Publication 590-A (Contributions to Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)) and IRS Publication 590-B Distributions from Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) for more details and speak with your tax advisor prior to making any decisions.
  • Please be sure to look for the matching tax year when reviewing IRS Publication 590 (Publications 590-A and 590-A). We have included these links to the IRS website's pages covering Publications 590-A and 590-A for your convenience. The IRS site still shows the 2016 publications as of January 2018.
 

What is an IRA? 

IRA contribution deadline 2018

 

Learn about Traditional IRAs

 

 

 

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Learn more about retirement planning by visiting some of the links below:

Roth IRA

SEP IRA

SIMPLE IRA

Traditional IRA

Qualified Plans

Rollover IRAs

Find out how Place Trade can help you get the most out of your college planning by visiting some of the links below:


Coverdell ESA

529 College Savings Plans

UGMA/UTMA Accounts